READ MORE FROM ME

 

WRITING ON EDUCATION

I have been tapping away the past couple of years in a bid to contribute to burning debates in education. I am particularly passionate about connecting up disciplines and thinking and promoting deep, critical learning.

Book Chapter

"CRITICAL LITERACY IS AT THE HEART OF AN ANSWER"

Where I talk about tech regulation, content moderation and education. Forthcoming in 'Media, Technology and Education in Post-Truth Society. From Fake News, Datafication and Mass Surveillance to the Death of Trust', ed. by Alex Grech (Emerald, 2020).

EU Policy Project contribution

THE PENCIL CASE

Where I talk about the urgent need to shift to rethink how subjects are taught. Forthcoming.

Blog

Substack blog where I explore all things that have got my education hat twitching.

 

EARLIER PUBLICATIONS & BLOGGING

In a previous life, I researched and published work relating to the literature and history of Early Modern France and England – think the time period spanning from Bridgerton to roughly 150 years previous, depending on who you speak to of course!

FAIRYTALES

Or "Mme Aulnoy's Diverting Works " in The Cambridge Guide to C18th Novel

On the brink of being published, this is my snapshot of how and why fairytales crossed the channel from France to England (in a work which also features the word 'dotard' - remember that one?!)

PHD – ENGLISH BARBARIANS & FRENCH IDENTITY

Or "Discourses of Barbarity and Travel to England in the Formation of an Elite French Social Identity: A Recontextualisation of Voltaire’s 'Lettres philosophiques'" (I know, not very punchy!)

The relationship between England and France has hit the news many a time over the past few years. We know that there has long been a switch between enmity and friendship. But we know less about how a French identity was built in part through opposition to an imagined view of the English character.

I got my hands mucky (literally in many cases - I consulted C16th, C17th and C18th manuscripts) thinking about how the stereotype of the barbarian and the language travellers used helped create an early sense of 'Frenchness'. I could go on. (And indeed I did in the 100,000 words which ended up being my PhD thesis!)

YOUNG TRAVELS OF SELF-DISCOVERY: PAST AND PRESENT

(This was the title!)

"Whilst the gap year has come to enjoy increasing popularity in recent years, it is no new phenomenon. Throughout the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, the young elite of England and France undertook travels to and from the European continent, broadening their cultural horizons whilst reaffirming their patriotic superiority. What did these ‘Grand Tours’ look like, and what can they tell us about the modern ‘gap year’?"

PARIS, LONDON AND ECONOMIC VS CULTURAL CAPITAL

Or "Capitalising on the English Urban Model: The Writings of Miège (1685/1725) and Muralt (1725) and the Pitting of Economic Capital against the “Cultural Capital” of Paris"

More of my research on how the English and French viewed one another.

TRAVEL AND A NON-FRENCH ENGLISH IDENTITY

Or "Fashioning Englishness through the French Other: The 1719 English Translation of Misson’s 1698 Mémoires et Observations faites par un voyageur en Angleterre’"

We are lucky that today we can access all sorts of books originally written in languages we don't speak. Thank you translators! Critics often bemoan the unfaithfulness of translations to the original or cry out that stylistic flourishes have been lost. But translation today is a very different art to what it was in the C18th. 

In this essay, I explore how a translation of a 1698 French travelogue was cunningly transformed for the purposes of plugging into a growing sense of English identity. 

A FRENCH 'GRAND TOUR' TO ENGLAND

Or "The Duc de Rohan’s Voiage of 1600: Gallocentric Travel to England in the formation of a French Noble"

Another chapter in the travel and identity story. I got curious about this manuscript because so much ink had been spilt talking about how English nobles travelled to France. Here we have the practice going in the other direction with interesting results.

LONDON IN 1578

Or "The singularities of London, 1578 : les singularitez de Londres, noble, fameuse Cité, capital du Royaume d'Angleterre: ses antiquitez et premiers fondateurs, by L. Grenade"

This was a wonderful project to be part of: the transcription and translation of an account of travel to London by a Frenchman in 1578.

 

VIDEOS

 
 

Bath, UK | Anywhere

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©2021 Dr Emma Pauncefort